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The Alzheimer’s Research Center at National Clinical Research

Developing Tomorrow’s Alzheimer’s Medications Today
 

Is your memory getting worse?

Have you noticed that your memory is not as good as it used to be? Many believe that memory loss is a natural part of aging.  However, if your memory loss is impacting your day to day activities, it could be an early sign of Alzheimer’s disease.  Maybe it’s time to talk to a memory specialist and get tested. 

Sign up for a one-to-one, no-cost appointment with one of the doctors at the Alzheimer’s Research Center at National Clinical Research in Richmond.  During your visit, the doctor will teach you about Alzheimer’s, answer your questions,  tell you about our research program and test your memory.

OUR ALZHEIMER’S STUDIES

Click here to listen to a lecture from Dr. McKenney on the investigational medications we are testing (20 min)

Learn more about the Alzheimer’s medications and the research studies we are conducting:

In August, 2020, an investigational product which is designed to remove amyloid plaque from the brain of patients with mild memory loss and a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease was submitted to the FDA for review. This submission was undertaken because the medication was found to significantly slow the decline of memory in those who received the medication compared with those who did not. If approved by the FDA, this will represent the first medication in the history of mankind which would be available to those with early symptoms of Alzheimer’s Disease.

These events have prompted the start of a study in patients with no memory loss symptoms but who have a high risk of developing Alzheimer’s Disease to see if onset of the disease can be prevented or slowed. The medication being used is not the one described in the paragraph above but works in a similar way to remove amyloid plaque from the brain of patients.

The study is being conducted to determine whether the removal of plaque from the brain can lead to the prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease. The study will continue for 4 years with routine visits throughout this time to receive medication and undergo further testing.

55 years or older

  • Be 55 to 80 years old
  • If 55 to 65, the patient must have a first degree relative with a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease, or have a positive ApoE4, or have confirmed amyloid plaque in their brain.
  • Has no evidence of memory loss on testing
  • Has a person who could serve as a study partner by having at least weekly contract with the participant.
  • Has no history of strokes or seizures
  • Has had no major psychiatric disease in the past 2 yrs.
  • Is able to undergo an MRI (i.e. has no metal in their body which prohibits this scan).
  • Complete up to 5 visits over 90 days to determine whether the individual qualifies to participate in the study. This will include having a PET brain scan conducted to determine whether amyloid plaque is present.
  • Once qualified, the participant will return to the research center every two weeks to receive study medication for 18 months and thereafter once monthly for 30 months.

You will be reimbursed for your participation.

Want to participate? Fill out the interest form! Click to Call Us!

Background

Scientists have learned that a build-up of amyloid plaque in the brain is neurotoxic (which means it is bad for brain cells) causing brain cells to degenerate and die which leads to subsequent memory loss/dementia. We are conducting several studies to see if a study medication can remove the amyloid plaque present in the brain and  whether removing this plaque can either stop or slow the loss of memory.

Criteria to participate

Some of the criteria patients must satisfy to participate are:

  • Age between 50 and 85 years old
  • Have a study partner (i.e. someone who is with you for 8 hours or more each week and would be willing to come to the study center about twice a year with you)
  • Demonstrate a mild level of memory loss with testing
  • Have a positive PET (brain scan) for amyloid plaque
  • Able to have an MRI scan (that is no metal in your head or upper torso)
  • Has no medical conditions which may also cause memory loss (e.g. Parkinson’s, uncontrolled sleep apnea, and history or stroke)

About the Study

Once the study criteria are met, the patient will receive either the study medication or a placebo for the duration of the study; neither the patient nor the doctor will know which is assigned. The study medication is infused into a vein in your arm once or twice a month over about 1½ hours. During the study, MRI scans of the brain are repeated and once each year, an amyloid PET scan is conducted. The study will last 18 to 24 months. After completion of the main study, all patients are offered real medication (no placebo) for 2 years or until the medication is available on the market. There is no cost to the patient for medical care provided in the study nor for any of the scans, memory testing, or medication.

Current Studies

We are currently conducting the following studies with medications which seek to remove brain amyloid plaque

Study

Sponsor

Study medication

NCT number

Study Status

GRADUATE Roche Gantenerumab NCT03444870 Closed to new patients
AACG Lilly Donanemab NCT03367403 Closed to new patients
221AD301 Biogen Aducanumab NCT04241068 Closed to new patients
301 Eisai Lecanemab NCT03887455 Closed to new patients
AACI Lilly  Donanemab NCT05026866  Closed to new patients
AACN Lilly  Donanemab NCT05108922  Closed to new patients

You may use the NCT number to learn more about the study we are conducting by going to clinicaltrials.gov and entering the number in the search bar.

Background

Semaglutide is a medication approved by the FDA for the treatment of diabetes and over-weight or obesity. In studies for these conditions, semaglutide and other medications like it have shown improved memory function, less build-up of brain plaque, and a reduction of inflammation in the body. All of these effects may be beneficial in patients with mild memory loss. This study is undertaken to demonstrate whether semaglutide can help patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease.

Criteria to participate

Some of the criteria patients must satisfy to participate are:

  • Male or female between 55 and 85 years old
  • Have a study partner (i.e. someone who is with you for 8 hours or more each week and would be willing to come to the study center about twice a year with you)
  • Demonstrates mild memory loss with testing
  • Has a positive PET (brain scan) for amyloid plaque
  • Is able to have an MRI scan (e.g. no metal in your head or upper torso)
  • Has no medical conditions which may also cause memory loss (e.g. Parkinson’s, uncontrolled sleep apnea, and history or stroke)

 About the Study

Once the study criteria are met, the patient will receive either the study medication or a placebo for the duration of the study; neither the patient nor the doctor will know which is assigned. At the beginning of the study, MRI scans and an amyloid PET scan will be conducted. The study medication is taken once daily by mouth. The study will last for 2 to 3 years. There is no cost to the patient for medical care provided in the study nor for any of the scans, memory testing, or medication.

Current Studies

Study

Sponsor

Study medications

NCT number

Study Status

EVOKE Novo Nordisk semaglutide NCT04777409  Open to new patients

Coming in the future

How do you know if you are experiencing early signs of memory loss or Alzheimer’s Disease? The best way, and the way it is done in our research studies, is to undergo 2-3 hours of memory (cognitive) testing using multiple instruments by a memory specialist or a neuropsychologist. But most of us just want a quick and easy way to figure out whether we have anything to worry about.

To try to get a quick read on whether you may be having memory issues, take the test at this link

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Please use the following form to contact us for general inquiries. If you are interested in a clinical trial, please complete our interest form.

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